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"Migrate To The Moon Before It's Too Late."

American Interterrestrial Society Archives, Super 8 Film, 2015

 

AIS Letter copy.jpg
    Shortwave radio and Space Race technology of the 1950’s and 1960’s cultivated intensely individual and collective experiences that connected us through distance and encouraged us to explore the unknown. My research on shortwave radio and space travel as landmarks of exploration includes photographs, shortwave spy codes, a spacesuit, and a collection of the QSL cards that shortwave operators mail to one another. Photographs are portals within our subjective and objective memories, histories that are both true and fabricated. Distant Transmissions is presented under the guise of the “American Interterrestrial Society”, a fictitious organization that comments on our role in history and how our history is informed and changed by technology.     Photography encourages us to dream of exploring unknown lands through its subjective nature. The blending of real and make believe will produce a visual dialogue that asks: How quiet would things be if all other technology failed and we only heard the humming of radios? How would we communicate differently if we only had shortwave radio? Would we be able to hear the humming of radios from other planets? What does static sound like in space? When you come back from space, do you miss it? Do you hear the stars pounding in your ears? Can historical technology remind us of a history that is no longer ours? Can we reclaim history and make it our own? Do we find history or create it?

Shortwave radio and Space Race technology of the 1950’s and 1960’s cultivated intensely individual and collective experiences that connected us through distance and encouraged us to explore the unknown. My research on shortwave radio and space travel as landmarks of exploration includes photographs, shortwave spy codes, a spacesuit, and a collection of the QSL cards that shortwave operators mail to one another. Photographs are portals within our subjective and objective memories, histories that are both true and fabricated. Distant Transmissions is presented under the guise of the “American Interterrestrial Society”, a fictitious organization that comments on our role in history and how our history is informed and changed by technology.

Photography encourages us to dream of exploring unknown lands through its subjective nature. The blending of real and make believe will produce a visual dialogue that asks: How quiet would things be if all other technology failed and we only heard the humming of radios? How would we communicate differently if we only had shortwave radio? Would we be able to hear the humming of radios from other planets? What does static sound like in space? When you come back from space, do you miss it? Do you hear the stars pounding in your ears? Can historical technology remind us of a history that is no longer ours? Can we reclaim history and make it our own? Do we find history or create it?

4 copy.jpg
  Interterrestrial Space Suit, Mixed Media, Found Objects, 2016

Interterrestrial Space Suit, Mixed Media, Found Objects, 2016

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  Space Diagram #1-3, Gum Bichromate, 2016

Space Diagram #1-3, Gum Bichromate, 2016

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 Letter From An Esteemed Member, 2016

Letter From An Esteemed Member, 2016

  Distant Transmissions #1-13, Gum Bichromate, 2016

Distant Transmissions #1-13, Gum Bichromate, 2016

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  QSL Card Collection, Mixed Media, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, Super Sauce Transfers, 2015

QSL Card Collection, Mixed Media, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, Super Sauce Transfers, 2015

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  Audio, Found Objects, QSL Card Collection, Images Transferred with SuperSauce, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, 2016                              

Audio, Found Objects, QSL Card Collection, Images Transferred with SuperSauce, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, 2016

                          

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  Distant Communications, Collaboration with Harrison Walker, Cabinet with Objects and Images, Gum Bichromate, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, 2016              
  
 
  
    
  
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  Our collaboration formed at Maine Media Workshops in the summer of 2015.  We explored Maine looking for found objects that showed a physical record of time, objects that evoked the tactile power of memory. This seemingly endless search sparked our desire to collaborate. Once apart at our respective schools, we have been sending each other postcards and objects through the mail, altering, manipulating, and layering them.  These exchanges lead to a culminating installation at our MFA thesis exhibitions in Greenville, North Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We have arranged the cards and objects inside a cabinet we found in Maine.  This work embodies the power of both individual and shared memories. We explore the intersections of tactile memory and history. We are investigating photographic methods in relation to memory and its mutability over time.  Our work includes processes such as Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, and Salt Printing.  These 19thh century techniques create images with a grainy, soft focused quality that mimic the act of remembering. The aesthetics of our work demonstrate the layering, covering up, removing, and altering of what we remember over time. We believe our memories are a copy of a copy, constantly changing.     
  
 
  
     
  
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   The contents we place inside the cabinet change each time it is reassembled mimicking ways in which we remember.    http://harrisondwalker.com

Distant Communications, Collaboration with Harrison Walker, Cabinet with Objects and Images, Gum Bichromate, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, 2016         

Our collaboration formed at Maine Media Workshops in the summer of 2015.  We explored Maine looking for found objects that showed a physical record of time, objects that evoked the tactile power of memory. This seemingly endless search sparked our desire to collaborate. Once apart at our respective schools, we have been sending each other postcards and objects through the mail, altering, manipulating, and layering them.  These exchanges lead to a culminating installation at our MFA thesis exhibitions in Greenville, North Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We have arranged the cards and objects inside a cabinet we found in Maine.

This work embodies the power of both individual and shared memories. We explore the intersections of tactile memory and history. We are investigating photographic methods in relation to memory and its mutability over time.  Our work includes processes such as Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, and Salt Printing.  These 19thh century techniques create images with a grainy, soft focused quality that mimic the act of remembering. The aesthetics of our work demonstrate the layering, covering up, removing, and altering of what we remember over time. We believe our memories are a copy of a copy, constantly changing.   The contents we place inside the cabinet change each time it is reassembled mimicking ways in which we remember. 

http://harrisondwalker.com

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  Sample of Distant Communications Cards, 2015-2016

Sample of Distant Communications Cards, 2015-2016

"Migrate To The Moon Before It's Too Late."

American Interterrestrial Society Archives, Super 8 Film, 2015

 

Shortwave radio and Space Race technology of the 1950’s and 1960’s cultivated intensely individual and collective experiences that connected us through distance and encouraged us to explore the unknown. My research on shortwave radio and space travel as landmarks of exploration includes photographs, shortwave spy codes, a spacesuit, and a collection of the QSL cards that shortwave operators mail to one another. Photographs are portals within our subjective and objective memories, histories that are both true and fabricated. Distant Transmissions is presented under the guise of the “American Interterrestrial Society”, a fictitious organization that comments on our role in history and how our history is informed and changed by technology.

Photography encourages us to dream of exploring unknown lands through its subjective nature. The blending of real and make believe will produce a visual dialogue that asks: How quiet would things be if all other technology failed and we only heard the humming of radios? How would we communicate differently if we only had shortwave radio? Would we be able to hear the humming of radios from other planets? What does static sound like in space? When you come back from space, do you miss it? Do you hear the stars pounding in your ears? Can historical technology remind us of a history that is no longer ours? Can we reclaim history and make it our own? Do we find history or create it?

Interterrestrial Space Suit, Mixed Media, Found Objects, 2016

Space Diagram #1-3, Gum Bichromate, 2016

Letter From An Esteemed Member, 2016

Distant Transmissions #1-13, Gum Bichromate, 2016

QSL Card Collection, Mixed Media, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, Super Sauce Transfers, 2015

Audio, Found Objects, QSL Card Collection, Images Transferred with SuperSauce, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, 2016

                          

Distant Communications, Collaboration with Harrison Walker, Cabinet with Objects and Images, Gum Bichromate, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, 2016         

Our collaboration formed at Maine Media Workshops in the summer of 2015.  We explored Maine looking for found objects that showed a physical record of time, objects that evoked the tactile power of memory. This seemingly endless search sparked our desire to collaborate. Once apart at our respective schools, we have been sending each other postcards and objects through the mail, altering, manipulating, and layering them.  These exchanges lead to a culminating installation at our MFA thesis exhibitions in Greenville, North Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We have arranged the cards and objects inside a cabinet we found in Maine.

This work embodies the power of both individual and shared memories. We explore the intersections of tactile memory and history. We are investigating photographic methods in relation to memory and its mutability over time.  Our work includes processes such as Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, and Salt Printing.  These 19thh century techniques create images with a grainy, soft focused quality that mimic the act of remembering. The aesthetics of our work demonstrate the layering, covering up, removing, and altering of what we remember over time. We believe our memories are a copy of a copy, constantly changing.   The contents we place inside the cabinet change each time it is reassembled mimicking ways in which we remember. 

http://harrisondwalker.com

Sample of Distant Communications Cards, 2015-2016

 "Migrate To The Moon Before It's Too Late."  American Interterrestrial Society Archives, Super 8 Film, 2015   
AIS Letter copy.jpg
    Shortwave radio and Space Race technology of the 1950’s and 1960’s cultivated intensely individual and collective experiences that connected us through distance and encouraged us to explore the unknown. My research on shortwave radio and space travel as landmarks of exploration includes photographs, shortwave spy codes, a spacesuit, and a collection of the QSL cards that shortwave operators mail to one another. Photographs are portals within our subjective and objective memories, histories that are both true and fabricated. Distant Transmissions is presented under the guise of the “American Interterrestrial Society”, a fictitious organization that comments on our role in history and how our history is informed and changed by technology.     Photography encourages us to dream of exploring unknown lands through its subjective nature. The blending of real and make believe will produce a visual dialogue that asks: How quiet would things be if all other technology failed and we only heard the humming of radios? How would we communicate differently if we only had shortwave radio? Would we be able to hear the humming of radios from other planets? What does static sound like in space? When you come back from space, do you miss it? Do you hear the stars pounding in your ears? Can historical technology remind us of a history that is no longer ours? Can we reclaim history and make it our own? Do we find history or create it?
4 copy.jpg
  Interterrestrial Space Suit, Mixed Media, Found Objects, 2016
3.JPG
  Space Diagram #1-3, Gum Bichromate, 2016
14.jpg
16.jpeg
 Letter From An Esteemed Member, 2016
  Distant Transmissions #1-13, Gum Bichromate, 2016
2.jpg
1.jpg
10 copyGum.jpg
5.jpg
6.jpg
13.jpg
9.jpg
10.jpg
11Gum.jpg
12.jpg
11.jpg
10Gum.jpg
  QSL Card Collection, Mixed Media, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, Super Sauce Transfers, 2015
2.jpg
3.jpg
5.jpg
9.jpg
6.jpg
19.jpg
8.jpg
13.jpg
7.jpg
17.jpg
18.jpg
15.jpg
110.jpg
16.jpg
20.jpg
8.jpg
  Audio, Found Objects, QSL Card Collection, Images Transferred with SuperSauce, Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, 2016                              
9.jpg
10.JPG
  Distant Communications, Collaboration with Harrison Walker, Cabinet with Objects and Images, Gum Bichromate, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, 2016              
  
 
  
    
  
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  Our collaboration formed at Maine Media Workshops in the summer of 2015.  We explored Maine looking for found objects that showed a physical record of time, objects that evoked the tactile power of memory. This seemingly endless search sparked our desire to collaborate. Once apart at our respective schools, we have been sending each other postcards and objects through the mail, altering, manipulating, and layering them.  These exchanges lead to a culminating installation at our MFA thesis exhibitions in Greenville, North Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We have arranged the cards and objects inside a cabinet we found in Maine.  This work embodies the power of both individual and shared memories. We explore the intersections of tactile memory and history. We are investigating photographic methods in relation to memory and its mutability over time.  Our work includes processes such as Cyanotype, Gum Bichromate, and Salt Printing.  These 19thh century techniques create images with a grainy, soft focused quality that mimic the act of remembering. The aesthetics of our work demonstrate the layering, covering up, removing, and altering of what we remember over time. We believe our memories are a copy of a copy, constantly changing.     
  
 
  
     
  
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   The contents we place inside the cabinet change each time it is reassembled mimicking ways in which we remember.    http://harrisondwalker.com
12.jpg
14.jpg
3.jpg
5.jpg
  Sample of Distant Communications Cards, 2015-2016